Boris Johnson resignation jeopardizes future of ‘white paper’ iGaming review

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In the United Kingdom and the announcement earlier today by Prime Minister Boris Johnson (pictured) that he was standing down as leader of the Conservative political party has reportedly thrown the future of the nation’s ‘white paper’ review of its online gambling market into jeopardy.

According to a report from a source, the controversial leader made his decision public via a press conference outside 10 Downing Street this afternoon although confusion abounds as to how long the 58-year-old intends to remain the nation’s Prime Minister. This move was purportedly prefaced by a swath of high-level ministerial resignations including from the man who had been in charge of overseeing the ‘white paper’ review as Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Tech and the Digital Economy, Chris Philp.

Positive plan:

Johnson’s government reportedly launched its investigation into the current state of the country’s iGaming market some 20 months ago through the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and was preparing to lay out its future vision via the imminent publication of a ‘white paper’. This exercise was to have ultimately resulted in legislative alterations to the Gambling Act of 2005 potentially encompassing the imposition of maximum online single stake limits and increased affordability checks alongside a complete ban on the use of credit cards.

Serious setback:

However, Philp’s resignation has reportedly thrown the future of this ‘white paper’ review into danger and could ultimately result in the entire endeavor being delayed by many months or even years. The 45-year-old Member of Parliament for the Croydon South constituency nevertheless purportedly told Sky News that he would be prepared to return to his former post after Johnson is replaced as Prime Minister, which may not happen until the autumn.

Philp reportedly stated…

“If I was asked to help out to get the Online Safety Bill to Parliament, I would be willing to help out in any way I could, in any capacity, whoever the leader was and whatever the circumstances were; that’s a matter of public service. I want to be clear I’m not asking for that and I’m not expecting it. I have resigned and when you resign you resign. If I can help out practically, I will obviously give practical assistance.”

Incoming incertitude:

The membership of the Conservative political party will now reportedly only be able to hold a leadership election to select Johnson’s replacement once the contentious figure officially stands down as Prime Minister. The nation’s new chief will subsequently select the members of their own cabinet who could purportedly well have divergent views on the ‘white paper’ process and any existing recommendations.